19 Dec 2019

Climate Reads

It's the silly season! To-do lists, over-flowing shopping carts, queues and traffic. We all love this time of year for the abundance of sunshine (hmm...), family get-togethers and hopefully some days to kick back with a good book. We're excited about some new releases that have just hit our shelves that address the expansive and troubling topic of climate change. If you're after some summer reads to engage your mind check out some of our new books - there are options for the whole family too, as Greta and the Giants has just been published, a beautifully illustrated picture book that opens the conversation of climate change for youngsters with big hearts and minds. 

Greta and Greta v2

It's the silly season! To-do lists, over-flowing shopping carts, queues and traffic. We all love this time of year for the abundance of sunshine (hmm...), family get-togethers and hopefully some days to kick back with a good book. We're excited about some new releases that have just hit our shelves that address the expansive and troubling topic of climate change. If you're after some summer reads to engage your mind check out some of our new books - there are options for the whole family too, as Greta and the Giants has just been published, a beautifully illustrated picture book that opens the conversation of climate change for youngsters with big hearts and minds. 
Libraries climate reads Dec 19

  •  No one is too small to make a difference collects together the various speeches young Greta Thunberg, of Sweden, has made on climate change action. At a compact 68 pages, this is a quick read that crisply addresses the ideas that have sparked a global movement toward change. 

  • Naomi Klein is back with her latest title On Fire: The Burning Case for a Green New DealKlein’s seventh book gathers for the first time Naomi’s impassioned reporting from the frontlines of climate breakdown, and pairs it with new material on the high stakes of what we choose to do next.

  • Tatiana Schlossberg addresses the seemingly small, everyday actions that unwittingly are contributing to the global catastrophe. The physical things we interact with every day and lots of our daily activities don’t exist in a vacuum—they’re much more connected to each other, to global climate change, and to each one of us than we think.

  •  The Guardian reviews Jonathan Safran Foer's latest non-fiction contribution: "In 2018, despite knowing more about climate change than we have ever known, we produced more greenhouse gases than we have ever produced, at three times the rate of global population growth. Climate change, therefore, exists as a rhetorical challenge as much as a scientific one. The most pressing question is how to persuade people to act, and to act now, both on an individual basis and, particularly, collectively." In We Are the Weather the idea of complacency and some of the major contributors to climate change, including animal farming, are explored. "A warning: this is a life-changing book and will alter your relationship to food for ever. I can’t imagine anyone reading Safran Foer’s lucid, heartfelt, deeply compassionate prose and then reaching blithely for a cheeseburger."

Libraries climate reads Dec 19 CL

A search for climate change on our catalogue reveals a growing range of resources for children including non-fiction and picture books. Featured here are Sea Bear by Lindsay Moore, Greta and the Giants by Zoe Tucker and Climate Change by Izzi Howell.